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ADS supports D-Day Squadron with Ergo 180

May 9, 2019

Aeronautical Data Systems (ADS), an innovative provider of pilot-friendly technology that drastically improves operational safety, is providing the D-Day Squadron with its Ergo 180 technology to ensure the safe passage all C-47 and DC-3 aircraft and flight crews as they cross the North Atlantic to celebrate the 75th anniversary of D-Day. 

 

Thanks to ADS’s support, all crew will have access to Ergo 180, a pilot-friendly app that clearly displays key decision-making information in the event of an emergency landing on land or water, including aircraft location, fuel range at given fuel flow and ground speed, glide range based on aircraft specs, diversion airports within range and ships within range for quickest possible rescue.

 

ERGO 180's primary function is to provide a visual representation of the aircraft's fuel range and glide range at any given point. Utilizing a detailed airport database of more than 8,000 facilities worldwide, color coded rings simplify diversion airport decision-making should any of the squadron pilots encounter unexpected changes in the cockpit. The app also utilizes an extensive maritime database to ensure an expedient rescue should an aircraft have to make a water landing.

 

ADS co-founder and CEO James Stabile explains, “When the unthinkable happens, you're not necessarily in range of a suitable airport for an emergency landing. Ergo 180 taps a 220,000+ live-streaming maritime database to display vessels that are within your aircraft's current fuel and glide range. While we sincerely hope the D-Day Squadron won’t need to utilize this feature, we provide them with the ability to view vessel speed, direction and country of origin – optimizing a water landing for the quickest possible rescue.”

 

On May 19th, the D-Day Squadron will depart Oxford-Waterbury airport in Connecticut and head East to cross the Atlantic along the original “Blue Spruce” route that was used to ferry aircraft during the Second World War. The squadron of C-47s and DC-3s will depart from Oxford, Connecticut (KOXC), stop to refuel in Goose Bay Airport (CYYR) in Newfoundland, Canada, Narsarsuaq Airport (BGBW) in southern Greenland, Reykjavik Airport (BIRK) in Iceland and refueling a final time at Prestwick Airport (EGPK) on the Western coast of Scotland before making the final leg to Duxford Airfield (EGSU) north of London.

 

Once arriving in Duxford Airfield, the D-Day Squadron will join with its European counterpart, Daks over Normandy, to participate in multiple events between June 2-5, 2019. The combined fleet of historic aircraft will cross the English Channel on June 5, fly over Normandy, France and participate in multiple events at Caen-Carpiquet Airport from June 5-9, 2019.

 

 “This is really a big deal for us,” says Moreno Aguiari, Director of Marketing and Public Relations for the D-Day Squadron. “This is the kind of support that provides an important extra level of safety for our flight crews. Safe passage for our warbird aircraft and their specialty-rated pilots is of paramount importance. The support from Aeronautical Data Systems and so many others is invaluable in bringing these highly significant and legendary aircraft back to Normandy.”

 

Be sure to keep up with the latest news as additional leaders in aviation join the D-Day Squadron mission to honor the few remaining members of the Greatest Generation that participated in the D-Day invasion and salute the monumental effort that changed the world over 70 years ago.

 

 

 

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